13 November 2013

NGC 891

NGC 891 in LRGB
 More information about this photo : http://www.astropixel.gr/5/post/2013/11/ngc-891.html

NGC 891 (also known as Caldwell 23) is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy (actually barred) about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6, 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster. It has an H II nucleus.
The object is visible in small to moderate size telescopes as a faint elongated smear of light with a dust lane visible in larger apertures.
In 1999, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged NGC 891 in infrared.
In 2005, due to its attractiveness and scientific interest, NGC 891 was selected to be the first light image of the Large Binocular Telescope. In 2012, it was again used as a first light image of the Discovery Channel Telescope with the Large Monolithic Imager.
Supernova SN 1986J was discovered on August 21, 1986 at apparent magnitude 14.

09 October 2013

NGC 7380 in LHaRGB

The Wizard Nebula (Sh 2-142)
NGC 7380 (also known as the Wizard Nebula) is an open cluster discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1787. William Herschel included his sister's discovery in his catalog, and labelled it H VIII.77. It is also known as 142 in the 1959 Sharpless catalog (Sh2-142). This reasonably large nebula is located in Cepheus.

30 September 2013

Sh 2-155 Cave Nebula

C9 Cave nebula

The Cave Nebula, Sh2-155 or Caldwell 9, is a dim and very diffuse bright nebula within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity. It is located in the constellation Cepheus.
Visually it is a difficult object, but with adequate exposure, makes a striking image. The nebula gets its name from the dark lane at the eastern side abutting the brightest curve of emission nebulosity which gives the appearance of a deep cave when seen through a telescope visually.

25 September 2013

M 33 The Triangulum Galaxy

M 33 in LRGB
 More information about this photo : http://www.astropixel.gr/5/post/2013/09/m-33.html

 Luminance : 70 minutes
Red,Green and Blue : 40 minutes each
Total time : 190 minutes

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a nickname it shares with Messier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy and about 30 other smaller galaxies. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye

18 July 2013

IC 5067 in HaLRGB

Ic 5067 Pelican Nebula
More information about this photo: IC 5067 in HaLRGB

Luminance: 16x240sec 1x1bin
Red: 7x240sec 1x1bin
Green: 7x180sec 1x1bin
Blue: 7x300sec 1x1bin
Ha Astrodon 5nm :19x600sec
Total: 338 minutes (5 hours and 38 min)

The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC 5070 and IC 5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name. The Pelican Nebula is located nearby first magnitude star Deneb, and is divided from its more prominent neighbour, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.
The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain, and among these are found two jets emitted from the Herbig–Haro object 555. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

07 July 2013

IC 5067 in Ha filter(Astrodon 5nm)

IC 5067 Pelican nebula in Ha
More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/ha-photography.html

Fits : 19x600sec all 1x1 bin 
From Manor Observatory at Piraeus,Gr

16 June 2013

IC 5146 -Reprocessed old fits-

IC 5146 Cocoon Nebula
More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/IC 5146

IC 5146 (also Caldwell 19, Sh 2-125, and the Cocoon Nebula) is a reflection/emission nebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cygnus. IC 5146 refers specifically to the nebula and Collinder 470 to the star cluster.[3] It shines at magnitude +10.0[4]/+9.3[2]/+7.2.[5] Its celestial coordinates are RA 21h 53.5m, dec+47° 16′. It is located near the naked-eye star Pi Cygni, the open cluster NGC 7209 in Lacerta, and the bright open cluster M39.[1][4] The cluster is about 4,000 ly away, and the central star that lights it formed about 100,000 years ago;[6] the nebula is about 12 arcmins across, which is equivalent to a span of 15 light years.[5] When viewing IC 5146, dark nebula Barnard 168 (B168) is an inseparable part of the experience, forming a dark lane that surrounds the cluster and projects westward forming the appearance of a trail behind the Cocoon.

13 June 2013

M 57 The Ring Nebula

M 57 in HaO3LRGB
More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/m 57
The Ring Nebula (also catalogued as Messier 57, M57 or NGC 6720) is a planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Lyra.[5] Such objects are formed when a shell of ionized gas is expelled into the surrounding interstellar medium by a red giant star, which was passing through the last stage in its evolution before becoming a white dwarf.
This nebula was discovered by the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, fellow French astronomer Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and German-born astronomer William Herschel speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unresolvable with his telescope.

04 June 2013

M 57 in Ha (255 minutes)

M 57 Ring Nebula 

Astrodon Ha 5nm : 15x600sec - 1x1500sec - 4x1200sec 
3 June 2013 from Manor Observatory-Piraeus,Greece

24 April 2013

M 106 in LRGB

More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/M 106

Messier 106 (also known as NGC 4258) is a spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. M106 is at a distance of about 22 to 25 million light-years away from Earth. It is also a Seyfert II galaxy, which means that due to x-rays and unusual emission lines detected, it is suspected that part of the galaxy is falling into a supermassive black hole in the center. NGC 4217 is a possible companion galaxy of Messier 106.

12 March 2013

M 78 in LRGB

                                 More information about this photo: http://www.astropixel.gr/M 78


The nebula Messier 78 (also known as M 78 or NGC 2068) is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1780 and included by Charles Messier in his catalog of comet-like objects that same year.
M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that include NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex and is about 1,600 light years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th magnitude. These two stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.